Getting Personal with Direct Mail

Suzanne Sullivan by Suzanne Sullivan | 9th September 2010

Ok, so we’ve all referred to Direct Mail as junk at one point or another.

Yes, it can be annoying and intrusive, but it can also be timely, informative and relevant.

There are many tricks you can use to ensure your Direct Mail is opened, read and enjoyed and to try and cover all of them here would take some time. If you have identified Direct Mail as a critical part of your Marketing Strategy, I would encourage you to get in touch to find out how we could help but for now, here are a few ideas.

Careful and selective targeting

It’s simply not good enough to say that because your business is in Sussex, you can serve all people or businesses within Sussex. You can do better than that. If B2B, think about industry type, type of premises, number of employees, annual turnover and most importantly, the decision maker. So for example, don’t send stationery magazines to the MD of a company if there’s an office manager, your Direct Mail will be binned before you can say junk mail!

writing business letter with direct mail

If B2C and you have a large customer base, it is beneficial to segment them based on the data you hold about them so as you can personalize your message to each particular group.

Never send your Direct Mail to ‘the office manager’. Instead give the company a call, find out the name of the office manager, then give them a call and ask them if you can send your information. With permission, your mailer is really in with a good chance.

Let’s get onto the Direct Mail letter itself..

Within your letter you need to have a clear call to action. Remember that it’s not always about urging people to pick up the phone and buy from you. You can ask people to agree to a telephone chat, an informal meeting or to subscribe to an e-newsletter. Don’t be too hasty in pushing people too quickly through to action. There are four key stages in the marketing process; Attention, Interest, Desire and Action, often referred to as AIDA. The important thing to know is that people need to move through all of these stages. If the letter is the first contact, your goal should be to encourage attention & interest, therefore the call to action may be to request a free brochure which can then create the desire.

At this point you may be thinking “I haven’t got time to do all this”. Well unfortunately, yes this approach is time intensive but well worth it, the results will be significantly better. For clients that would like to set up a Direct Mail campaign themselves, I always advise to keep it small and manageable. Try to aim for sending about 10 mailers a week. If you would like to speak to an expert about your Direct Mail, why not give us a call. We specialise in Direct Mail for small businesses so we will develop a targeted, Direct Mail campaign that doesn’t break the bank.

Thank you for reading my article. I hope you have found it useful. Coming next time: Direct Sales.

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